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10 Communication Tips for Leaders

Want to lead more effectively? Communicate more effectively. Communication skills are so essential  for leaders that it is simply impossible to become a great leader without being a great communicator. While developing an understanding of great communication skills is easier than one might think, being able to appropriately draw upon said skills when the chips are down is not always as easy as one might hope for. See if this thought resonates with you – it’s been my experience that most leaders overestimate their communications ability. Thinking you’re a great communicator isn’t the same thing as being one. In today’s post I’ll share a few of the communication traits, that if used consistently, will help you achieve better results in the workplace.

Oddly enough, the key to becoming a skillful communicator is rarely found in what has been taught in the world of academia. From our earliest days in the classroom we are trained to focus on annunciation, vocabulary, presence, delivery, grammar, syntax and the like. In other words, we are taught to focus on ourselves. While I don’t mean to belittle these things as they’re important to learn, it’s the more subtle elements of communication that are rarely taught in the classroom (the elements that focus on others) that leaders desperately need to learn. It is the ability to develop a keen external awareness that separates the truly great communicators from those who muddle through their interactions with others.

I don’t believe it comes as any great surprise that most leaders spend the overwhelming majority of their time each day in some type of an interpersonal situation. I also don’t believe it comes as a great shock to find that a large number of organizational problems occur as a result of poor communications. It is precisely this paradox that underscores the need for leaders to focus on becoming great communicators.

Skills acquired and/or knowledge gained are only valuable to the extent that they can be practically applied when called for. Leaders have a much broader span of communications and therefore must be able to communicate effectively whether dealing with interpersonal, intergroup, intragroup, organizational, or external communications. It has been my experience that the number one thing that great communicators have in common is that they possess a heightened sense of situational and contextual awareness. The best communicators are great listeners and observers. Great communicators can read a person/group by sensing the moods, dynamics, attitudes, values and concerns of those being communicated with. Not only do they read the environment well, but they possess the uncanny ability to adapt their messaging to said environment without missing a beat. The message is not about the messenger; it has nothing to do with messenger; it is however 100% about meeting the needs and the expectations of those you’re communicating with.

So how do you know when your skills have matured to the point that you’ve become an excellent communicator? The answer is that you’ll have reached the point where your interactions with others consistently use the following 10 principles:

  1. Speak not with a forked tongue: In most cases people just won’t open up those they don’t trust. When people have a sense that a leader is worthy of their trust they will invest time and take risks in ways they would not if their leader had a reputation built upon poor character or lack of integrity. While you can attempt to demand trust it rarely works. Trust is best created by earning it with right acting, thinking, and decisioning. Keep in mind that people will forgive many things where trust exists, but will rarely forgive anything where trust is absent.
  2. Get personal: There is great truth in the axiom that states: “people don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” Classic business theory tells leaders to stay at arms length. I say stay at arms length if you want to remain in the dark receiving only highly sanitized versions of the truth. If you don’t develop meaningful relationships with people you’ll never know what’s really on their mind until it’s too late to do anything about it.
  3. Get specific: Specificity is better than Ambiguity 11 times out of 10: Learn to communicate with clarity. Simple and concise is always better than complicated and confusing. Time has never been a more precious commodity than it is in today’s marketplace. It is critical that you know how to cut to the chase and hit the high points, and that you expect the same from others. Without understanding the value of brevity and clarity it is unlikely that you’ll ever be afforded the opportunity to get to the granular level as people will tune you out long before you ever get there. Your goal is to weed out the superfluous and to make your words count.
  4. Focus on the leave-behinds not the take-aways: The best communicators develop the ability to get the information they need while leaving the other party feeling as if they got more out of the conversation than you did. While you can accomplish this by being disingenuous, that is not the goal. When you truly focus more on what you leave behind than what you take away you will have accomplished the goal. Even though this may seem counter-intuitive, by intensely focusing on the other party’s wants, needs & desires, you’ll learn far more than you ever would by focusing on your agenda.
  5. Have an open mind: I’ve often said that the rigidity of a closed mind is the single greatest limiting factor of new opportunities. In my opinion a leader takes their game to a whole new level the minute they willingly seek out those who hold dissenting opinions and opposing positions with the goal not of convincing them to change their minds, but with the goal of understanding what’s on their mind. I’m always amazed at how many people are truly fearful of opposing views as opposed to being genuinely curious and interested. Open dialogs with those that confront you, challenge you, stretch you, and develop you. Remember that it’s not the opinion that matters, but rather the willingness to discuss it with an open mind.
  6. Shut-up and listen: Simply broadcasting your message ad-nauseum will not have the same result as engaging in meaningful conversation, but this assumes that you understand that the greatest form of discourse takes place within a conversation, and not a lecture or a monologue. When you reach that point in your life where the light bulb goes off, and you begin to understand that knowledge is not gained by flapping your lips, but by removing your ear wax, you have taken the first step to becoming a skilled communicator.
  7. Replace ego with empathy: I have long advised leaders not to let their ego write checks that their talent can’t cash. When cador is communicated with empathy & caring and not the prideful arrogance of an over inflated ego good things begin to happen. Empathetic communicators display a level of authenticity and transparency that is not present with those who choose to communicate behind the carefully crafted facade propped-up by a very fragile ego. Understanding the this communication principle is what helps turn anger into respect and doubt into trust.
  8. Read between the lines: Take a moment and reflect back on any great leader that comes to mind…you’ll find that they are very adept at reading between the lines. They have the uncanny ability to understand what is not said, witnessed, or heard. Being a leader should not be viewed as a license to increase the volume of rhetoric. Rather astute leaders know that there is far more to be gained by surrendering the floor than by filibustering. In this age of instant communication, everyone seems to be in such a rush to communicate what’s on their mind that they fail to realize everything to be gained from the minds of others. Keep your eyes & ears open and your mouth shut and you’ll be amazed at how your level or organizational awareness is raised.
  9. When you speak, know what you’re talking about: Develop a technical command over your subject matter. If you don’t possess subject matter expertise, few people will give you the time of day. Most successful people have little interest in listening to those individuals that cannot add value to a situation or topic, but force themselves into a conversation just to hear themselves speak. The fake it until you make it days have long sense passed, and for most people I know fast and slick equals not credible. You’ve all heard the saying “it’s not what you say, but how you say it that matters,” and while there is surely an element of truth in that statement, I’m here to tell you that it matters very much what you say. Good communicators address both the “what” and “how” aspects of messaging so that they don’t fall prey to becoming the smooth talker who leaves people with the impression of form over substance.
  10. Speak to groups as individuals: Leaders don’t always have the luxury of speaking to individuals in an intimate setting. Great communicators can tailor a message such that they can speak to 10 people in a conference room or 1,000 people in an auditorium and have them feel as if you were speaking directly to each one of them as an individual. Knowing how to work a room and establish credibility, trust and rapport are keys to successful interactions.
  • Bonus – Always have a Plan B: Another component of communications strategy that is rarely discussed is how to prevent a message from going bad, and what to do when does. It’s called being prepared and developing a contingency plan. Again, you must keep in mind that for successful interactions to occur, your objective must be in alignment with those you are communicating with. If your expertise, empathy, clarity, etc. don’t have the desired effect, which by the way is very rare, you need to be able to make an impact by changing things up on the fly. Use great questions, humor, stories, analogies, relevant data, and where needed, bold statements to help connect and engender the confidence and trust that it takes for people to want to engage. While it is sometimes necessary to “Shock and Awe” this tactic should be reserved as a last resort.

One final thought – don’t assume that someone is ready to have a particular conversation with you just because you’re ready to have the conversation with them. Spending time paving the way for a productive conversation is far better than coming off as the proverbial bull in a china shop. Furthermore, you cannot assume that anyone knows where you’re coming from if you don’t tell them. I never ceased to be amazed at how many people assume that everyone knows what they want to occur without ever finding it necessary to communicate their objective. If you fail to justify your message with knowledge, business logic, reason etc., you will find that said message will likely fall on deaf ears needing reinforcement or clarification afterwards.

Bottom line…The leadership lesson here is that whenever you have a message to communicate (either directly, or indirectly through a third party) make sure that said message is true & correct, well reasoned, and substantiated by solid business logic that is specific, consistent, clear and accurate. Spending a little extra time on the front-end of the messaging curve will likely save you from considerable aggravation and brain damage on the back-end. Most importantly of all, keep in mind that communication is not about you, your opinions, your positions or your circumstances. It’s about helping others by meeting their needs, understanding their concerns, and adding value to their world. Do these things and you’ll drastically reduce the number of communications problems you’ll experience moving forward.

Feel free to add to the list or to share any additional thoughts in the comments below…

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    Rick Martin

    January 10, 2011 at 1:50 am

    This is a great list, including the bonus and "final thought". I'd include them in the list and make it an even dozen. I've seen the final thought – not getting someone prepared for a conversation – scuttle many a well-intended chat.

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      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 2:04 am

      Thanks for the advice Rick…I probably should have made it an even dozen:). Thanks for stopping by.

      Avatar

      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 9:25 pm

      Thanks Rick…great suggestion and thanks for stopping by.

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Mike Henry Sr., Executive Oasis Intl, charleneobille and others. charleneobille said: RT @mikemyatt 10 Communication Tips for Leaders http://bit.ly/gMoTtL […]

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    Poul Andreassen

    January 10, 2011 at 5:40 am

    It is an amazing articles on leadership, which actually takes the meaning of leadership to new aspect.

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      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 10:00 am

      Thanks Poul…I appreciate the kind words.

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    pastortom2022

    January 10, 2011 at 7:04 am

    Great post Mike and very insightful. I try and inculcate the tolls you relay through your blog on a daily basis. Today's post is no exception. Thanks for the continued excellence and info you bring.

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      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 10:00 am

      Thanks Tom. I am always grateful for your encouragement.

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    William Powell

    January 10, 2011 at 8:42 am

    Great list Mike. I think the dissemination of news and info 24/7/365 makes for an assumption that everything needs an answer right now. Little respect or tolerance is given to the thoughtful answer. It's almost as if it is framed as a lack of knowing as opposed to a sign of wisdom.

    Thanks for pointing things in a healthier direction.

    Cheers,
    William

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      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 10:02 am

      Great observation William. I'm always appreciative of the value you add to the comment stream. Thanks for stopping by William.

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    Skip Weisman

    January 10, 2011 at 11:33 am

    Mike,
    This is a great article on leadership communication. In organizations "communication" is so often identified as an issue but few leaders take the time to dig in an define exactly what the communication problem is.
    In one organization I worked with 3 different groups of employees identified 'communication' as a problem, and after I dug deeper into the issues, all three had significantly different situations that needed 3 unique solutions.
    This article is a great primer for helping leaders more clearly define communication, my favorite is #3, mainly because its #1 on my list of "The 7 Deadliest Sins of Organizational Leadership Communication."

    If you, or anyone else is interest in reading about those they can download my report filled with specific client case studies at http://www.HowToImproveLeadershipCommunication.co

      Avatar

      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 12:23 pm

      Hi Skip:

      Thanks for the comment as well as for sharing your insightful observations. I appreciate you sharing your link which also contains some great advice. Thanks again for stopping by Skip.

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    edmusesupon

    January 10, 2011 at 5:19 pm

    Mike, I love this list. And the point you make about leadership itself not being taught is a deeply troubling one–troubling for its truth.

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      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 9:27 pm

      Glad you enjoyed the list and I agree about the troubling aspect of leaving necessary items out of mainstream curriculum.

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    Anne Messenger

    January 10, 2011 at 5:38 pm

    This piece is a wonderful way to start a new year. Many thanks for the thought you have put into this, Mike.

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      mikemyatt

      January 10, 2011 at 9:27 pm

      You're welcome Anne and thanks for the kind words.

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    Maria Payroll

    January 14, 2011 at 12:41 pm

    Great post. Thank you for sharing those wonderful tips. Communication is very important, not just in the work field, but also with your relationships. You need to talk about problems. If you think something is bothering your employee, talk to him. He might be having difficulties. Communication does not mean that you do all the talking. Sometimes, simply listening to your employee can help them get things off their mind.

    […] 10 Communication Tips for Leaders […]

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